Saskatchewan Seeding 7% Complete



Seeding is underway in Saskatchewan but at a slightly slower pace compared to last year and the average.

The first provincial crop report for the 2020 growing season on Thursday pegged overall seeding at 7% complete as of Monday, 6 points behind last year and 2 points back of the five-year average. A slow start to spring has delayed field operations in areas of the province, but most producers have indicated they will be out in the field within the next few weeks as ‘fields dry up and soil temperatures rise,’ the report said.

The southeast region of the province is the most advanced with 10% of the crop in the ground as of Monday. An estimated 9% was seeded in the southwest, 7% in the west-central, 2% in the east-central and northwest regions and less than 1% in the northeast.

Eleven percent of the field peas, 10% of the chickpeas and durum, 9% of the lentils and oats, 4% of the spring wheat and 2% of the canola were reported seeded. Winter wheat assessments are continuing as fields green up and temperatures rise.

Rainfall was reported this past week throughout the province, particularly in the southeast and east-central regions. The Indian Head area received the highest amount at 37 mm.

Cropland topsoil moisture was rated as 7% surplus, 81% adequate, 11% short and 1% very short as of Monday.

Southeast:

Some producers in the region have been able to start seeding. Ten per cent of the crop is now seeded, which is below the five-year average (2015-2019) of 12 per cent for this time of year. Producers in some parts of the region are still waiting for their land to dry up before they can start seeding. Twenty-four per cent of the field peas, 14 per cent of the lentils, 10 per cent of the durum, nine per cent of the barley, eight per cent of the oats and six per cent of the spring wheat has been seeded to date.

There has been scattered rain showers throughout the region, with some farmers reporting hail and snow flurries. The Indian Head area received the highest amount of rain at 37 mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 15 per cent surplus, 75 per cent adequate, nine per cent short and one per cent very short.

Rain showers and cool weather throughout the week have slowed down field work in some parts of the region. Grass is greening up in some areas and spring winter wheat assessments continue.

Southwest:

Nine per cent of the crop is now seeded, which is behind the five-year average (2015-2019) of 17 per cent for this time of year. In some areas, fields are still wet, but most producers have been able to start field work such as spraying, harrowing, rock picking and harvesting the 2019 crop. Ten per cent of the durum, barley and field peas, eight per cent of the canola and lentils, seven per cent of the spring wheat and five per cent of the mustard has been seeded to date.

Most the of region received a small amount precipitation, which was welcome, especially with the drying winds that occurred over the past week. The Vanguard area received the highest amount of precipitation at 14 mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate and 13 per cent short.

Grass is turning green and some producers have been able to move their cattle into pasture or plan to soon. There are reports that some fields have winterkill damage in their fall seeded crops.

East-Central:

Cool temperatures in the region have prevented seeding from beginning in most areas. Currently two per cent of seeding is completed in the region, which is on track with the five-year average (2015-2019) of two per cent for this time of year. Most of the crop that has been seeded is field peas, as well as some spring wheat and lentils. Farmers have been able to continue harvesting the 2019 crop and start field work such as harrowing and applying fertilizer, while others are waiting for their fields to dry.

Farmers have indicated that moisture levels are good for seeding and fields have been drying. The Rocanville area received the most rain this week at 26 mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and 17 per cent short.

There is some weed emergence in the region. It is still too early to estimate the condition of winter cereals in areas where they were able to be seeded last fall.

West-Central:

A few producers have begun seeding in the region while others expect to within the next week or two. Seven per cent of the crop is in, which is slightly above the five-year average (2015-2019) of five per cent for this time of year. Twelve per cent of the lentils, 11 per cent of the durum, 10 per cent of the oats, nine per cent of the chickpeas, seven per cent of the field peas and five per cent of the spring wheat has been seeded to date.

With the dry, windy conditions this week the small amount of rain that the region received was welcome. Tugaske received the highest amount of rain in the region at 12 mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 77 per cent adequate, 17 per cent short and six per cent very short.

Pastures have been greening up and there has been weed emergence in some areas of the region. Spring winter wheat assessments continue as fields green up.

Northeast:

Field work in parts of the region has started, with harrowing and pre-seeding work underway. Many farmers are waiting for it to dry up before they can get out into the field, and others will start field work and seeding in the next few weeks if the weather stays warm. Farmers have also harvested some of last year’s crop that was left out over winter. Less than one per cent of seeding is done in the region, which is slightly below the five-year average (2015-2019) of one per cent for this time of year.

Rain in the region ranged from none to six mm in the Nipawin area. Fields in most of the region have lots of moisture and most farmers are waiting for them to dry. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as nine per cent surplus and 91 per cent adequate.

Northwest:

Farmers have been able to get out into the field in some areas of the region, but most are waiting for their fields to dry. Two per cent of the seeding is done, which is below the five-year average (2015-2019) of five per cent. Most of the crop that has been seeded is field peas and spring wheat. Harvest of last year’s crop is underway in parts of the region, and most producers are planning to start pre-seeding work in the next few weeks.

There was a small amount of rain in the region, with St. Walberg receiving the most at 10 mm. Most of the fields have adequate topsoil moisture available to start seeding. Tame grasses are starting to green up as well. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent surplus, 95 per cent adequate and one per cent short.

Source: DePutter Publishing Ltd.

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